About Fethiye

Fethiye is one of Turkey’s well-known tourist centres and is especially popular during the summer.

Fethiye is a tourist town with an international atmosphere. It has an excellent marina and good night life. The town also serves as an excellent base for touring the inland country-side, and is probably the only city in the world where you’ll find sarcophagus in the streets. These pre-Roman Lycian relics are especially spectacular when floodlit at night. The town has a population of around 50,000 but the population increases dramatically during the high season, from April to end of October, when off-shore residents spend their summers at their second homes.

In the last ten years Fethiye has become a magnet for British citizens. Apart from its climate and natural beauty, the Britons are attracted by its less expensive lifestyle and the hospitality of the local people. The British population in Turkey is between 34,000 and 38,000. As a result of the large British population and the high numbers of Britons going there for holiday, Fethiye-Öludeniz was chosen as the best tourism centre in the world by The Times and The Guardian newspapers in 2007. Over 7,000 British citizens permanently live in Fethiye, while approximately 600,000 British tourists visit the town every summer.

Summers are extremely hot with temperatures well above 40°C in July and August, you should drink plenty of water to keep hydrated which is important in a very hot place such as Fethiye. Winters are cool with temperatures around 14-20°C. Spring and Autumn are the wettest seasons, yet still very sunny, which is the best time to go for people who want a warm holiday that is not too hot like the summer, with temperatures around 20-28°C.

The Fethiye Museum, which is very rich in ancient and more recent artifacts, displays and testifies to the successive chain of civilizations that existed in the area, starting with the ancient Lycians.

Fethiye is also home to the Tomb of Amyntas, a large and beautiful tomb built in 350 BC by the Lycians. What makes this tomb very unique is its massive size and beautiful carvings.

Source: via Fethiye

Fethiye has a Mediterranean climate consisting of very hot, long and dry summers with an average of 34°C (93°F) in the daytime, winters are cool and rainy with a daytime average of 16°C (61°F).

The airport that serves Fethiye areas is called DALAMAN AIRPORT.

Modern Fethiye is located on the site of the ancient city of Telmessos, the ruins of which can be seen in the city, e.g. the Hellenistic theatre by the main quay.

Telmessos was the most important city of Lycia, with a recorded history starting in the 5th century BC.

A Lycian legend explains the source of the name Telmessos as follows[citation needed]: The god Apollo falls in love with the youngest daughter of the King of Phoenicia, Agenor. He disguises himself as a small dog and thus gains the love of the shy, withdrawn daughter. After he reappears as a handsome man, they have a son, whom they name ‘Telmessos’ (the land of lights). The city became part of the Persian Empire after the invasion of the Persian general Harpagos in 547 BC, along with other Lycian and Carian cities. Telmessos then joined the Attic-Delos Union established in mid-5th century BC. and, although it later left the union and became an independent city, continued its relations with the union until the 4th century BC.

The oracle of Telmessos, devoted to Apollo, had great impact on the course of ancient history.[clarification needed]

Legend says that Alexander the Great, on a mission to invade Anatolia in the winter of 334–333 BC, entered Telmessos harbour with his fleet. The commander of the fleet, Nearchus, asks permission of King Antipatrides of Telmessos for his musicians and slaves to enter the city. On getting the permission, the warriors with weapons hidden in the flute boxes capture the acropolis during the feasts held at night.

By the 10th century, it came to be called Makri (< μακρή ‘distant’), after the name of the island at the entrance to the harbor.

Telmessos was ruled by the Anatolian beylik of Menteşe starting in 1284, under the name Megri. It became part of the Ottoman Empire in 1424.

The town grew considerably in the 19th century, and had a large Greek population at this time; it was known as Μάκρη (“Makri”) in Greek.[1] Following the population exchange between Greece and Turkey, the Greeks of Makri were sent to Greece where they founded the town of Nea Makri (New Makri) in Greece.[1] The town was resettled with Turks from Greece.

In 1934, the city was renamed ‘Fethiye’ in honor of Fethi Bey, one of the first pilots of the Ottoman Air Force, killed on an early mission.

Fethiye has experienced many earthquakes. Last significant ones date to 1957 and 1961, with 67 casualties and 3200 damaged buildings after the 25.04.1957 earthquake.[2] The town has been rebuilt since then and now has a modern harbor and a marina.

*info courtesey of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fethiye

Things to See /Do

  • The cave tombs — located in the cliff on the south side of town
  • The Lycian sarcophagus — There are a number of stone sarcophagii carved in typical Lycian style scattered around the town, with one of the most preserved ones lying in the yard of town governor’s office (kaymakamlık) at the main street and other on the middle of the road heading uphill towards the cave tombs and  Kayajkoy
  • Beach activities – swimming, lounging, parasailing, paragliding, canoes etc. The Dead Sea/Blue Lagoon Oludeniz region has pretty warm water temperatures during summer season.
  • Hiking – Fethiye marks the beginning of the Lycian Way – a 500 km marked hiking trail running to Antalya.
  • Tuesday Farmers’ Market
  • Island Day Cruises – An armada of boats of all sizes leave their harbor berths each day at approximately 10:00AM and return at approximately 6:00PM. While you can charter the entire boat in advance, most are run on a first come first serve communal basis. Lunch is usually provided, and depending on the size of the boat prices can range from $10 to $30 for an entire day. Destinations during the cruise include local lagoons, beaches, sea caves and other features where you are given time to swim or explore the local islands.
  • Yacht charter in the Aegean Sea
    • Windward Islands, one of the worlds largest yacht charter companies, can take care of all charter requirements, from bareboat to luxury yacht in the Aegean Sea. Operating from 9 offices worldwide (USA, Spain, UK, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Switzerland, Caribbean, Honk Kong and Dubai).
  • Paragliding Fethiye is one of the most popular places around Europe to try this extreme sport. The activity starts from Babadağ, a mountain around 1900 mt high, and ends on the beach after a nice trip above Oludeniz. There are many schools and training centers which can provide training even for fresh beginners, or you are free to enjoy tandem flights which include the pilot and a passenger.
  • The Blue Lagoon — a famous (perhaps the most famous in Turkey) beach area located in Oludeniz to south of Fethiye, with a pretty nice lagoon seperated from open sea by a sandbar. About 30 minutes away by dolmuş.
  • Saklikent Gorge — a stunning geological site located inland on the Teke Peninsula (between Fethiye and Antalya), about 40 km southeast of Fethiye. This is a great place for a leisurely hike. If you want to explore the gorge a bit further upstream, be prepared for some clambering and getting wet!
  • Lycian ruins — located on outer islands, take a boat from Ölüdeniz.
  • Kayakoy Village — a hiking destination, these are the ruins of a Greek settlement abandoned in 1923 when the governments of Turkey and Greece mandated population swaps. Features some well-preserved structures, including a church.
  • Butterfly Valley and Kabak — two isolated canyons bordering the seashore to the south of Fethiye. They both feature waterfalls. Butterfly Valley is hippie haven (though with the growing interference of the mass tourism) situated in a narrow canyon with almost no overland connection to the rest of the world, while remoter Kabak is the perfect place to escape the package tourist groups, and a great place on the Turkish Mediterranean to camp and have a truly laid-back experience.
  • Weekly boat tours around the spectacular Lycian Coast all the way east to Olympos can be arranged through numerous companies from Fethiye during the high season (April to October).

*Courtesey of http://wikitravel.org/en/Fethiye

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